Ivor and Nancy Johnson

Nanwalek resident Nancy Yeaton contacted me wondering if we had information on her grandparents, Ivor and Nancy Johnson. She said that they had breakdowns after watching helplessly as two of their children died in a horrific fire in Nikiski. After the fire, Ivor and Nancy were sent to Morningside Hospital and the children (2 boys and a girl) were sent to the Jesse Lee Home, an orphanage in Alaska, and then to California during the war. Nancy, named after her grandmother, never knew her grandparents. Ninilchik SchoolNancy’s uncle, Alan Johnson or Lindstrom, was also sent to Morningside for a short period for evaluation. Nancy would greatly appreciate any photos or information on Ivor, Nancy and Alan. Here’s what we know (from Department of the Interior administrative records) about Ivor and Nancy: Nancy Johnson (patient #1785) was committed from Seldovia on January 27, 1939 and admitted to Morningside on February 10, 1939. She was born in Alaska and of Russian and Alaska Native heritage. Nancy was 31 when admitted and was diagnosed as having dementia praecox and depression. One record noted that she had insulin therapy at some point during her stay at Morningside Hospital. lvor Johnson (patient # 1952) was committed at Kodiak on October 14, 1941 and admitted to Morningside on November 14, 1941. Ivor was born in Sweden and was a carpenter. He wasn’t a citizen but had been in the US for 20 years, 10 of them in Alaska. He was committed because of loss of memory and an inability to care for himself. He had positive blood and spinal Wassermans and an advanced case of general paresis. They were both listed as still being at Morningside in 1955.
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2 Comments

  1. Sherry B
    Posted May 23, 2013 at 11:43 pm | Permalink

    As I mentioned to Ellen in a phone interview–Nancy & Ivor were still at Morningside in 1966. I was an adolescent private pay patient from Portland and was told Nancy and Ivor’s story by an aide, I recall. Neither Nancy or Ivor spoke to others or each other. I was told they did not recognize each other or remember they were married. Now knowing that they had been there over 20 years is just so sad.

  2. Nancy Yeaton
    Posted March 5, 2015 at 3:17 pm | Permalink

    Thank you so much for the above information. All that I can gather about my mothers side of family since we never heard any history of Mom and her family. This is my history even if there is sadness associated with my family. This adds so much richness to the history of where I came from and who I am today. I am so glad there is information to find about my family.

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