Native Tubercular Children

Three children were admitted to Morningside on September 16, 1930 from Riverton Sanitarium in Seattle. They all had tuberculosis and no mental illness or other disability. They were sent to Morningside by the US Department of Education and arrived with no records of any kind. The picture below is from 1931. The caption sayes, "Native tubercular children. These children are cared for in their own department at Morningside Hospital." [download id="108"] from 1932 indicate that Bertha Koenig was 9 when she arrived at Morningside after spending 4 years in Seattle hospitals. Her family was from McGrath and the record notes that her father was white and her mother Native Alaskan. Her prognosis was, “poor for recovery. Duration of life uncertain, perhaps a few years.” John Mosquito was 5 when he was admitted. His record noted, “We have never learned from what part of Alaska this child came, nor the names or where-abouts of his relatives, if any.” He had the same prognosis as Bertha. In 1933, the National and Alaska American Legion demanded that the children be moved elsewhere. F.S. Fellows, the medical director of the Alaska Medical services, summarized their criticisms and demands in a [download id="109"] to John Collier, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Dr. Fellows recommended that the children remain at Morningside. We have no information on the eventual outcome.
This entry was posted in 1930-1949, Patient Photos, Patient Stories. Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

One Comment

  1. Eric
    Posted March 2, 2012 at 4:17 pm | Permalink

    Bertha Koenig was interred in Multnomah Park Cemetery on 29 April 1933.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*